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Tips & Hints

1. Why buy a BBQ from THE BBQ SHOP?
2. What should I look for in a good bbq?
3. What type of cooking grills are better?
4. How to reset your regulator
5. BBQ Smoking Tips
6. Cooking Turkey On Your Weber Grill
7. How to take care of your cast iron cooking grills
8. How to clean your stainless steel cooking grills
9. Trouble Shooting your Napoleon BBQ

10. Traeger Grill FAQ's
11. BroilKing Grilling Tips Videos

12. Napoleon Maintenance Tips:

Grill Brush Safety
How To Prevent Grease Fires
Cleaning pilot orifice on your Napoleon Patio Heater 
Simple tips to help prepare for BBQ season
How to test for leaks
How to clean your grids
How do I replace the igniter electrodes on my Napoleon grill?
How do I care for the cast iron cooking grids?     
How do I clean my stainless steel lid?
How do I clean my Porcelain Lid?
How do I remove the burners on my grill?
How do I clean the drip pan?
How do I clean the cast aluminum base on my grill? 
How do I clean my burners?

13. Napoleon Maintenance Tips:
Electrode And Collector Box Installation
Replacing Rear Burner Electrode

14. Napoleon FAQ's

How do I use the Smoker Burner and Tray on a PRO665 & PRO825?
Do I Need To Register My Purchase?
Where can I get a replacement part for my grill?
Can I buy a Napoleon® Grill online?
"Regulator" - Definition
Paint appears to be peeling inside lid
The burners will not cross-light each other
My regulator is humming
The burner will not light with the igniter, but will light with a match what is wrong?
I am having trouble lighting my barbecue
The flames lift away from the burner and I smell gas
Burners are burning with a yellow flame, and I smell gas
Why am I getting excessive flare-ups and uneven heat?
I am getting low heat / low flame when the valve is turned to high
How do I cook the perfect steak on the infrared burner?
How do I protect the infrared burners on my grill?
How do I clean my infrared burner?
How does infrared cooking work?
What are the benefits of infrared cooking?
What do I do with used charcoal?
How do I store charcoal?
How do I light charcoal?
How do I use the Napoleon® Smoker Tube?
How to use the Indirect Cooking Method on your Barbecue
"Indirect Cooking" - Definition
How to use your Napoleon® Rotisserie
"Smoking" - Definition
What is a "Charcoal Tray Insert" and how do I use it?
"Rotisserie" - Definition
"Cooking Grids" - Definition
"Sear Plates" - Definition
"Temperature Gauge" - Definition
"Carbon Monoxide" - Definition
"i-Glow knobs" - Definition
"Side Burner" - Definition
"Rear Burner" - Definition
"Charcoal" - Definition
"Infrared SIZZLE ZONE" - Definition
BTU - Definition

15. Napoleon Lifestyle Articles
Seven Common Grilling Mistakes And How To Avoid Them
Get Into The Zone When Grilling
"Clinching" or Down 'n' Dirty Grilling 
Why Are Napoleon Grills So Efficient During Winter
Favorite Foods Cooked On A Gas Barbeque Grill  
Cooking With Propane Grills: Tips Everyone Can Use
Cold Weather Tips For Using Your Barbeque Grills  
The Best BBQ: Smokers Vs Grills
Out Of Oven Space? Use Your Charcoal BBQ Grill For Thanksgiving
Using Your Charcoal BBQ In Any Weather: Tips For Grilling In The Wind
Fun Grilling Accessories: Adding To Your Experience
BBQ Tools: Making Sure You Have The Tools Of The Trade
Cooking Tips For Working With Charcoal BBQ Grills
Charcoal BBQ Grills Vs Natural Gas BBQ Grills
Big, Bigger, Biggest: How To Choose The Right Size BBQ Grill
Pizza On A BBQ Gas Grill? (Yes, It’s Possible!)  
Best Barbecues: How to throw the best barbecues
Indoor Vs Outdoor BBQ  
Choosing The Best Charcoal Grills  
Stainless Steel BBQ: Why Stainless Steel Is An Excellent Choice 
Best Gas Grills: How To Know You’re Buying The Best
Using A BBQ Smoker: Why Using A Smoker Is A Labour Of Love
Unusual BBQ Food: Dessert On The Grill
Going Camping? Don’t Forget The Portable BBQ
What Do The Best Outdoor Kitchens Include?  
Throwing The Best BBQ Party
Infrared; the next evolution in grilling 

 

1. Why buy a BBQ from THE BBQ SHOP?

  • We have Knowledgable Staff
  • We carry quality brand name bbqs
  • Our bbqs have quality components
  • Parts are available for the bbqs we sell

2. What should I look for in a good bbq?

1. Make sure that you are able to get parts for your bbq. For most box store bbqs and grocery store bbqs that you buy, you can't get parts for them. They may be good for the first year but after that, you will need to replace the burners and cooking grills which you will have a hard time finding parts for. Parts are available for the BBQs we sell because they are quality brand name BBQs.

2. Make sure the bbq has a good warranty. A good warranty will give you peace of mind knowing that you will be able to get replacement parts to fix your bbq. All the BBQs we carry have a 5 to 10 year warranty on the burners.

3. Make sure that the burners, cooking grills and the heat shields are made of good quality stainless steel. Good quality componenets will ensure that you have trouble free bbqing year after year. It will also ensure that you are not spending money on parts every year or two.

3. What type of cooking grills are better?

BEST: Stainless Steel are the best type of cooking grills. They are very low maintance, they retain their heat very well and they will last you for years.

GOOD: Porcelain on steel are good. The only thing with procelain is that you have to be extra careful when you're cleaning them. The porcelain will tend to chip and flake if you over clean them. The less you clean the better.

OK: Cast Iron with porcelain coating are ok. They require the most maintance. You have to make sure that you season the grills after each use. Make sure you bring your grills inside the house if you are not using your BBQ during the winter or if you know you are not going to use your BBQ for a long period of time. This will help them from rusting. If you have porcelain or cast iron cooking grills, its a good idea to switch over to stainless steel.

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4. How to reset your regulator

Click here to view
 

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5. BBQ Smoking Tips

Hungry for great smoked flavor? Our guides below will get your fire started whether you're using a charcoal grill, a gas barbecue, or a traditional smoker. We've got tips for beginners and a comprehensive Smoking Woods Chart to match the right woods with specific foods. Check out our list of recipes to get you started.

Woods: Start by soaking wood chunks in water for at least one hour; chips (including wine barrel chips) and aromatic twigs (grape vines or fruit wood twigs) need only 30 minutes of soaking. Shake all excess water off woods before adding them to your fire or smoker box. (See our chart below for available wood types.)
You can find smoking woods in hardware stores and home centers-or if you're lucky, in your own backyard! Wine barrel chips are available in specialty food stores and gift shops, and some hardware stores.

Water: Water adds moisture to the smoking process so meats come out flavorful and tender. If you're using a traditional smoker with a water pan, try adding barbecue sauce, marinades, wine, beer, fruit juices, or herbs and spices to the water pan for additional flavor. Be sure to keep the water pan full. For large roasts and turkeys, you may have to add water to the pan a couple of times throughout grilling. Check the water pan when you add charcoal-a watering can makes replenishing easy. (Note: When smoking cheese, add ice to the water pan so the cheese doesn't melt above it.) You can use a water pan with charcoal and gas grills, too.

Food: Place food in the center of the cooking grate above the water pan (if you are using one). Remember that smoke and heat escape every time you peek into the grill, so add 15 minutes to cooking time for each peek (more if you are smoking in cold weather). Boneless meats, such as beef brisket and pork shoulder, will shrink considerably during smoke-cooking, unless they have a heavy layering of fat. Simply cut off the fat before serving. (Note: Consider cooking your menu up to two days before serving. The smoke flavor becomes richer after a day or two in the refrigerator. That's why smoked foods make great leftovers.) All Weber recipes are based on 70-degree weather with little or no wind at average altitudes, so add more cooking time for wind, cold, and high altitudes.
Preparing your Charcoal Grill, Gas Barbecue, or Traditional Smoker

Charcoal Grill: Use the Indirect method by arranging charcoal briquets on each side of the charcoal grate. Place a heavy aluminum foil pan between the piles of briquets; add 2 cups water and any flavorings. Allow 30 minutes for coals to heat up (they should have a light coating of grey ash). Place soaked wood chunks or chips/twigs directly on prepared coals and allow to smoke fully before beginning cooking. Place food on top cooking grate over the water pan. Cover grill. Add 5 to 7 briquets to each side every hour; replenish water and seasonings as needed.

Gas Barbecue: Virtually all Weber Gas Barbecues can be equipped with or are sold with a smoker attachment (exceptions: Spirit Series and Genesis Junior). The smoker attachment makes it easy to turn your barbecue grill into a hot smoker. You can also improvise with a foil pan. Before preheating your grill, simply fill the water pan on the smoker attachment with hot tap water. Place presoaked wood chunks or chips/twigs in the other compartment, or in a foil pan directly on the Flavorizer Bars over the lit burner. (Use a separate pan for water if you are using a foil pan for the wood pieces.) Begin cooking after preheating and when grill is fully smoking. You can get a smoker attachment for your grill by visiting your local dealer, or calling Weber Customer Service at 1-800-446-1071. Please have your grill model number available.

Smoker: Always position smoker on a level, heatproof surface away from buildings and out of traffic patterns. It's best to find a place away from the house, since smoke aromas can linger for hours.
Weber's Smokey Mountain Cooker Smoker has three grates-one for charcoal and two for food-and a water pan. To prepare the smoker, heap charcoal in the center of the cooking grate, ignite the coals, and when coals have a light coating of grey ash, spread them evenly across the inside of the charcoal chamber. Check recipe for number of charcoal layers needed. If you are using the water pan, place it on the lower bracket of the center ring and fill it with hot tap water. Add seasonings to water, if desired.
Place soaked woods on the coals through the door on the front of the smoker. Keep all vents partially closed for smoke-cooking. Place food on the top and/or middle cooking grate, depending on recipe and food quantity. Arrange food in a single layer on each grate, leaving space for smoke to circulate around each piece. Add 12 to 14 briquets and as many wood chunks as needed to fire, and replenish water and seasonings.

Weber Chef's Tips for Beginners

Use a meat thermometer to make sure smoke-cooked foods are done but not overcooked. Smoke-cooked foods look different than other grilled or oven-prepared foods. They may be pink or red when completely cooked (apple wood especially will make chicken look red, for example).
Use tongs and barbecue mitts to add charcoal, turn meats, refill the water pan, or adjust vents.
Do not use charcoal infused with starter fluid-it can add an unpleasant taste to your smoked foods.
Experiment with different woods and meats until you find the right combination for your tastes.
Start with a small amount of wood to see how you like the flavor, then add more for more intense smoky taste. (Just don't overdo it; too much wood smoke over long periods can make food taste bitter.)
Try combining woods as you get more experienced for unique and flavorful results.
Keep a smoker's notebook while experimenting. Jot down ingredients, wood amounts and combinations, and results so you can repeat successes. (Unless, of course, you want to keep your best recipes a secret!)

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6. Cooking Turkey On Your Weber Grill

Grilled turkey is a delectable treat that's surprisingly easy to prepare. Our Turkey with Orange, Cloves, Garlic, and Sage is a basic recipe that's good for any time of year. Here are a few tips to make a flawless feast.

Before you start: Whether you're cooking on a charcoal or gas grill, make sure you have plenty of fuel. For gas grills, a full tank should last about 17 or 18 hours, so check your gas gauge before you start. For charcoal grills, check our Charcoal Guide to see how many briquets you need to add over the course of the grilling time.

Size: Weight is not really an issue as long as the turkey fits in your grill with the lid down to allow for Indirect Cooking (note that turkeys over 24 pounds may not fit under your grill lid). At least one inch clearance between the turkey and lid is ideal. So think structure. A broad, flat bird will fit better than one with a high breast bone. To determine the size of turkey you need to feed a specific number of guests, see our Portion Guide .

Thawing: A turkey should be completely defrosted in the refrigerator before grilling. Place the frozen turkey in its original wrapping on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow 24 hours of thawing time for every 4 pounds of turkey. Never thaw poultry at room temperature.

Fresh turkey: Grill fresh turkey just as you would a completely defrosted frozen one. Since fresh turkey is highly perishable, check the "sell by" date before you buy. Buy the turkey only 1 to 2 days before you plan to cook it and keep it refrigerated.

Food Safety: To avoid spreading dangerous bacteria to other foods, always wash hands, utensils, and work surfaces with hot soapy water after handling raw poultry. Cook stuffing in a covered foil pan beside the turkey on the grill, by the Indirect method, during the last 45 to 60 minutes of grilling time, to an internal temperature of 160°F.

Doneness: Turkey is fully cooked when a meat thermometer registers 180°F in the thigh or 170°F in the breast (about 11 to 13 minutes per pound). Remove turkey from the grill and allow to rest 20 minutes before carving. (If you're slow-smoking that bird, remember that a smoke-cooked turkey may appear a little pink, even when thoroughly cooked.) The following chart of cooking times are approximate. Allow more time for cold/windy days or high altitudes.

Cooking Times for Unstuffed Turkeys

10-11 lbs. = 1-3/4 to 2-1/2 hrs.
12-14 lbs. = 2-1/4 to 3 hrs.
15-17 lbs. = 2-3/4 to 3-3/4 hrs.
18-22 lbs. = 3-1/2 to 4 hrs.
23-24 lbs. = 4 to 4-1/2 hrs.

Turkey breasts: Whether you're feeding a smaller crowd or supplementing the menu for a large one, a turkey breast is a great idea. Grill a 3 to 3 1/2 pound boneless turkey breast by the Indirect method for 1 to 2 hours until the internal temperature reaches 170°F.

Turning and basting: The best part about grilling your bird on your Weber Grill is you don't have to turn or baste! Simply set up the grill for Indirect grilling, place the turkey in the center of the cooking grate, and close the lid. For charcoal grills, see our Charcoal Guide to add fuel as needed.

To make basic turkey gravy: Remove all but 1/4 cup of the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan. Gradually whisk 1/2 cup flour OR 1/4 cup cornstarch into the fat and drippings. Whisk over low heat until smooth, and cook for about five minutes, stirring constantly. Slowly whisk in 4 cups of liquid (broth, cooking water from the boiled giblets, or milk). Stirring constantly, raise heat to medium high and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until thickened, about 5 minutes, loosening the bits of cooked turkey from the bottom of the pan. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Timing: Working backward from a planned serving time, decide when each dish should be cooked so that foods with the longest cooking time can be started first.

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7. How to take care of your cast iron cooking grills

Cast iron cooking grills must be seasoned to protect the metal from rusting and to provide that non-stick surface. Seasoning cast iron is a process comprising of 3 simple steps:

1. Clean the cast iron grill with warm soapy water; rinse thoroughly and dry.
2. Apply a layer of fat all over (Watkins Grape Seed Oil or Watkins Cooking Spray is recommended)
3. Heat up the grills to a high temperature causing the oils to bond to the cast iron.

If your cooking grills develop rust spots, scour the rusty areas with steel wool, until all traces of rust are gone then wash, dry and repeat seasoning process.

• Clean the grill immediately after use.
• Run BBQ at a high temperature to burn off any remnants,
• Do not ever wash cast iron with soap or use a scratch pad - that would take off the protective coating
• Seasoning should be done at the beginning and end of barbecue season, or once a month if you barbecue year-round.

Download the PDF instructions

 

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8. How to clean your stainless steel cooking grills

Stainless steel cooking grates on barbecue grills are designed to be cleaned easily without incurring damage. If you follow certain steps after each time you grill, the time between thorough cleanings can be extended. 3 sided bbq brush is a stainless steel grate's best friend.

1. After grilling, turn the grill on high until the smoke dissipates. The heat will burn off any remaining particles.
2. Use the 3 sided grill brush to remove the remaining residue on the grates. Many grill brushes come with both a brush side and a scraper to remove stubborn particles. Try not to use the scraper edge.
3. If desired, wipe the surface down with a paper towel. For a more thorough cleaning, scrub the grate with a fine steel wool pad and soapy water. Apply light pressure. Rinse and allow to dry.

Download the PDF instructions

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9. Trouble Shooting your Napoleon BBQ

Download the trouble shooting PDF instructions

 

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10. Traeger Grill FAQ's

Download PDF FAQ's

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11. BroilKing Grilling Tips Videos

Click here to view BroilKing grilling tip videos

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12. Napoleon Maintenance Tips

Click here to view all the Napoleon Maintenance Tips below

Grill Brush Safety
How To Prevent Grease Fires
Cleaning pilot orifice on your Napoleon Patio Heater 
Simple tips to help prepare for BBQ season
How to test for leaks
How to clean your grids
How do I replace the igniter electrodes on my Napoleon grill?
How do I care for the cast iron cooking grids?     
How do I clean my stainless steel lid?
How do I clean my Porcelain Lid?
How do I remove the burners on my grill?
How do I clean the drip pan?
How do I clean the cast aluminum base on my grill? 
How do I clean my burners?  

BACK TO THE TOP

 

13. Napoleon Maintenance Tips:

Click here to view all the Napoleon Maintenance Tips below

Electrode And Collector Box Installation
Replacing Rear Burner Electrode

BACK TO THE TOP

 

14. Napoleon FAQ's

Click here to read some of the Napoleon FAQ's below

How do I use the Smoker Burner and Tray on a PRO665 & PRO825?
Do I Need To Register My Purchase?
Where can I get a replacement part for my grill?
Can I buy a Napoleon® Grill online?
"Regulator" - Definition
Paint appears to be peeling inside lid
The burners will not cross-light each other
My regulator is humming
The burner will not light with the igniter, but will light with a match what is wrong?
I am having trouble lighting my barbecue
The flames lift away from the burner and I smell gas
Burners are burning with a yellow flame, and I smell gas
Why am I getting excessive flare-ups and uneven heat?
I am getting low heat / low flame when the valve is turned to high
How do I cook the perfect steak on the infrared burner?
How do I protect the infrared burners on my grill?
How do I clean my infrared burner?
How does infrared cooking work?
What are the benefits of infrared cooking?
What do I do with used charcoal?
How do I store charcoal?
How do I light charcoal?
How do I use the Napoleon® Smoker Tube?
How to use the Indirect Cooking Method on your Barbecue
"Indirect Cooking" - Definition
How to use your Napoleon® Rotisserie
"Smoking" - Definition
What is a "Charcoal Tray Insert" and how do I use it?
"Rotisserie" - Definition
"Cooking Grids" - Definition
"Sear Plates" - Definition
"Temperature Gauge" - Definition
"Carbon Monoxide" - Definition
"i-Glow knobs" - Definition
"Side Burner" - Definition
"Rear Burner" - Definition
"Charcoal" - Definition
"Infrared SIZZLE ZONE" - Definition
BTU - Definition

BACK TO THE TOP

15. Napoleon Lifestyle Articles

Click here to view all the Napoleon articles below

Seven Common Grilling Mistakes And How To Avoid Them
Get Into The Zone When Grilling
"Clinching" or Down 'n' Dirty Grilling 
Why Are Napoleon Grills So Efficient During Winter
Favorite Foods Cooked On A Gas Barbeque Grill  
Cooking With Propane Grills: Tips Everyone Can Use
Cold Weather Tips For Using Your Barbeque Grills  
The Best BBQ: Smokers Vs Grills
Out Of Oven Space? Use Your Charcoal BBQ Grill For Thanksgiving
Using Your Charcoal BBQ In Any Weather: Tips For Grilling In The Wind
Fun Grilling Accessories: Adding To Your Experience
BBQ Tools: Making Sure You Have The Tools Of The Trade
Cooking Tips For Working With Charcoal BBQ Grills
Charcoal BBQ Grills Vs Natural Gas BBQ Grills
Big, Bigger, Biggest: How To Choose The Right Size BBQ Grill
Pizza On A BBQ Gas Grill? (Yes, It’s Possible!)  
Best Barbecues: How to throw the best barbecues
Indoor Vs Outdoor BBQ  
Choosing The Best Charcoal Grills  
Stainless Steel BBQ: Why Stainless Steel Is An Excellent Choice 
Best Gas Grills: How To Know You’re Buying The Best
Using A BBQ Smoker: Why Using A Smoker Is A Labour Of Love
Unusual BBQ Food: Dessert On The Grill
Going Camping? Don’t Forget The Portable BBQ
What Do The Best Outdoor Kitchens Include?  
Throwing The Best BBQ Party
Infrared; the next evolution in grilling 

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